Category Archives: Uncategorized

AMAZON CONVERSION PROGRAM PROBLEM

I was hoping I wouldn’t have to write this blog post.

Towards the end of October this year, the conversion program supplied by Amazon that is used in the publishing process for Kindle eBooks was updated. Following that change, the bird lists in the eBooks that I develop in Microsoft Word were not being presented correctly in tablet and phone Kindle reading apps. The conversion program introduced an indentation at the start of each paragraph in the lists. This didn’t happen on Kindle reading devices.

What this meant for the All the World’s Birds series of eBooks was that lists of bird species were no longer neatly left-aligned on tablets and phones. Also, because of the unwanted indentation, some lines were now too long and wrapped to the following line, even on the smallest font setting. The result on these reading devices was a mess.

Any ATWB title that was published prior to the end of October 2018 was unaffected. So customers are still able to purchase these titles with the confidence that they will be formatted acceptably on any reading device (Kindle/tablet/phone).

Unfortunately, before I spotted what was happening I updated the content of three existing titles and published one new one. The affected titles were:

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – PART-BY-PART
PART THREE: SANDGROUSE to OWLS
PART FOUR: FROGMOUTHS to HORNBILLS
PART FIVE: JACAMARS to OLD WORLD PARROTS

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – FOCUS ON
NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA VOLUME 2: SUBOSCINE PASSERINES:
SAPAYOA to TITYRAS, BECARDS, SHARPBILL

I highlighted the problem to Amazon and they appear to be experimenting with a new conversion program that more faithfully reproduces the intended layout. I managed to pick up and use this new program for two of the above titles: PART THREE and PART FOUR, which are now neatly laid out for use on all reading devices. However, the new conversion program is still being worked on – it comes and goes! So I still haven’t been able to re-publish the remaining two affected titles. With luck this will all be sorted out soon and normal service can resume.

Meanwhile, I have annotated the Description text for the remaining two corrupted titles, warning customers not to purchase them unless they intend to use them only on Kindle readers, and otherwise recommending that they postpone their purchase until after the conversion program problem has been resolved.

I first raised this problem with Amazon at the start of November, but five weeks later I am still in the situation where:

  • I cannot publish any new titles (I have five eBooks ready that I wanted to publish in December)
  • I cannot update the content of any existing titles
  • I have two remaining published titles that do not display correctly on tablets and phones

In the lead up to Christmas this situation has severely affected the extent of online marketing I can do. It has also somewhat dampened my enthusiasm for developing new titles.

Nevertheless, I shall follow through on my promise to make four titles available free-of-charge for a limited period. The following four eBooks – one from each ATWB series – will be free to download from Amazon from Sunday December 16 to Thursday December 20 USA Pacific time:

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – PART-BY-PART
PART THREE: SANDGROUSE to OWLS

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – WORLD REGIONS
SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES:
RHEAS to AFRICAN & NEW WORLD PARROTS

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – FOCUS ON
INDIAN SUBCONTINENT VOLUME 2: PASSERINES: BROADBILLS to BUNTINGS

All the World’s Birds 2019 : Interactive Checklists
SOUTH-WEST INDIA: DUCKS, GEESE AND SWANS to FINCHES, EUPHONIAS

Here are your links:

Amazon US
https://amzn.to/2C1NPPC    https://amzn.to/2KTOrpz
https://amzn.to/2ATaNaV    https://amzn.to/2CycmMo

Amazon UK
https://amzn.to/2PPDRUk    https://amzn.to/2P7eaOA
https://amzn.to/2OmTiBO    https://amzn.to/2MWhlep

Greetings of the season and a prosperous 2019 to all my readers!

 

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To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

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5 NEW ALL THE WORLD’S BIRDS TITLES

This month (October 2019) five new titles have been published in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides, bringing the total number that are complete and available for download to 21.

 

The PART-BY-PART series has moved into Passerines (“perching birds”). Parts 1 to 5 (first published last year) deal with all extant Non-Passerine bird species in the IOC bird list. Newly available titles are:

PART SIX: NEW ZEALAND WRENS to TYRANT FLYCATCHERS, CALYPTURA    1190 species

PART SEVEN: COTINGAS to WHISTLERS AND ALLIES    847 species

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ Part-by-Part series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBPPOr, click here to see all ATWBPP titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWBPP titles on Amazon UK.

 

The following three eBooks in the WORLD REGION series are also now available:

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – AUSTRALASIA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – AUSTRALASIA
VOLUME 2: PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA
VOLUME 2: SUBOSCINE PASSERINES

 

So, what are “Suboscine Passerines”?

Most extant Passerine bird species have a highly developed vocal chord in an organ called the syrinx – although some (such as crows) do not make full use of it. These species are classified within a suborder of Passerines called Passeri or Oscines (songbirds). The most primitive extant Passerine species do not have such a developed syrinx. All but two are classified into suborder Tyranni or Suboscines, with the New Zealand endemics Rifleman and New Zealand Rockwren (Family: New Zealand Wrens) being the only surviving species of the ancient Passerine suborder Acanthisitti.

Many of the extant Suboscine bird species are resident or otherwise regularly present in South America/Middle America (SA/MA). The third title in the list above covers all those 1267 species (including all SA/MA Ovenbirds, Antbirds, Tyrant Flycatchers, Cotingas, Manakins, Tityras and Becards), giving indications of distribution for many of them.

Volume 1 of the South America/Middle America World Region Companion Guide (first published in February this year) covers 1607 Non-Passerines. A third volume (to be released next year) will cover the SA/MA Oscine Passerines.

 

As you will have noted above, the birds of the Australasia world region have also been covered in two new titles. These volumes deal with all the regularly occurring bird species of Wallacea, New Guinea and nearby islands, Australia, New Zealand, and the oceanic islands and seas from the Solomons to Macquarie Island, listing local, country and regional endemics and providing distribution indications for most species. A “must have” for anyone planning to go birding within the region.

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ World Region series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBWROr, click here to see all ATWBWR titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWBWR titles on Amazon UK.

 

*** NEXT PLANNED FREE PROMOTION ***

Advance notice:

One title from each of the four series of ATWB Companion Guides will be offered free-to-download in the run up to Christmas 2018 (i.e. one title from each of the PART-BY-PART, WORLD REGIONS, FOCUS ON … and INTERACTIVE CHECKLISTS series). More details towards the end of November. [Note: none of the five newest titles listed above will be included in this promotion.]

 

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Some details …

 

Each ATWB Companion Guide deals with the birds to be found in a particular PART of the IOC bird list; a WORLD REGION or sub-region; or an area of the world popular with birders (e.g. North-east India).  All have a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where in each region each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

 

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

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Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

INTRODUCING INTERACTIVE CHECKLISTS

[Note: *** UPCOMING FREE eBOOK PROMOTION *** – see details below]

One of the major challenges facing birders when visiting an unfamiliar part of the world is working out which species they have a chance of connecting with during their visit. Traditional regional field guides, of course, are indispensable, but they have a number of shortcomings:

  • they are published and updated infrequently, meaning they cannot provide the latest information about species, regional distribution etc
  • they are generally inclusive, meaning they describe every bird species that has been recorded in the region, leaving the reader to sift through the vagrants, casuals and irruptive species that visiting birders are a lot less likely to encounter

To save birdwatchers the trouble of trawling through online information to supplement the details in their regional field guides, the All the World’s Birds (ATWB) Companion Guides series of Interactive Checklists is here to help. Over time, this series of eBooks will provide a library of up to date listings for areas of the world that are popular with birders.

Each eBook in the series will be updated annually to reflect the latest internationally accepted status of bird species as defined by the International Ornothological Congress (IOC). The eBooks will be priced low and will be formatted for all Kindle reading devices (tablets, smartphones, computers). Birders can download the free Kindle reading app to whichever device they will be taking with them.

Within each eBook, birders will find the following sections:

CHECKLIST – a list of all birds that are recognized as species in the IOC bird list and which are regularly present for at least a part of each year

TAXONOMIC LIST – taxonomic details of these birds, showing each species’ order, family, genus and scientific name

SPOTLIGHTED BIRDS – country, local and regional endemics, plus selected specialty birds that have a restricted range

INTRODUCED AND OTHER SPECIES

QUICK REFERENCE – follow the links to find birds based on their common English names

For more details about the Interactive Checklists series of ATWB Companion Guides, click here.

 

I am pleased to announce that 4 titles in the 2019 series of ATWB Interactive Checklists are now complete and available to be downloaded to Kindle reading devices.

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Interactive Checklists, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBICOr, click here to see all ATWBIC titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWBIC titles on Amazon UK. Or you can click here to see all ATWBIC titles in Amazon’s India bookstore.

 

The following INTERACTIVE CHECKLISTS are now available:

All the World’s Birds 2019: Interactive Checklist  SRI LANKA

All the World’s Birds 2019: Interactive Checklist  SOUTH-WEST INDIA

All the World’s Birds 2019: Interactive Checklist  NORTH CENTRAL INDIA

All the World’s Birds 2019: Interactive Checklist  NORTH-EAST INDIA

 

 

*** FREE PROMOTION ***

Advance notice:

To mark the launch of the new series of ATWB Interactive Checklists, the SRI LANKA and NORTH CENTRAL INDIA titles will be offered free of charge for five days, commencing Friday 21st September (USA Pacific time). Here are your links:

 

Amazon US      SRI LANKA     NORTH CENTRAL INDIA

 

Amazon UK      SRI LANKA     NORTH CENTRAL INDIA

 

Later this year I shall be releasing three new WORLD REGION eBooks:

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – AUSTRALASIA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – AUSTRALASIA
VOLUME 2: PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA
VOLUME 2: SUBOSCINE PASSERINES

 

To find links to all these Kindle eBooks on Amazon, and to see an up to date listing of all titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, click here.

 

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Some details …

 

Each of the currently available 2019 Companion Guides deals has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

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KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

ALL THE WORLD’S BIRDS 2019 TITLES

I am pleased to announce that 7 titles in the 2019 editions of the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides are now complete and available to be downloaded to Kindle reading devices.

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

 

The following eBooks are now available:

 

WORLD REGION guides:

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – OCEANS

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – WESTERN PALEARCTIC

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

 

FOCUS ON guides:

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide  Focus on INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide  Focus on INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
VOLUME 2: PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide  Focus on SOUTH-EAST ASIA
VOLUME 2: PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide  Focus on NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

 

*** FREE PROMOTION ***

Advance notice:

To coincide with the 27th IOCongress taking place in Vancouver next week (http://www.iocongress2018.com), the OCEANS, SOUTH-EAST ASIA and NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA eBooks will be FREE to download from Saturday 18th August to Wednesday 22nd August (USA Pacific time). Here are your links:

Amazon US     OCEANS     SOUTH-EAST ASIA     NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA

Amazon UK     OCEANS     SOUTH-EAST ASIA     NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA

 

At the end of August I shall be releasing PART-BY-PART eBooks:

PART ONE to PART FIVE cover the world’s 4297 Non-Passerine species. A new volume, PART SIX, covers 1190 Passerine species from New Zealand Wrens to Tyrant Flycatchers, Calyptura.

 

To find links to all these Kindle eBooks on Amazon, and to see an up to date listing of all titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, click here.

 

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Some details …

 

Each of the currently available 2019 Companion Guides deals with the birds to be found in a particular WORLD REGION or sub-region, and has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where in the region each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

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Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

10700+ SPECIES IN THE IOC BIRD LIST

On June 27 2018 the International Ornithological Congress (IOC) released the latest version of its world bird list (V8.2):

Gill, F & D Donsker (Eds). 2018. IOC World Bird List (v 8.2). doi :  10.14344/IOC.ML.8.2.

For the first time the number of non-extinct species in the list topped 10700, with the total now standing at 10711 – 4297 Non-Passerines and 6414 Passerines.

The details of the changes in the v8.2 release can be found by clicking on the Updates tab on the World Bird Names website. There is a summary of the major amendments below, but first let’s consider some immediate implications …

 

If you’ve ever seen a black-and-white Magpie in Hong Kong, or Seoul, or at the Great Wall of China, then you can add Oriental Magpie Pica serica to your life list. If you’ve seen one in north-west Africa, then that’s another ‘armchair tick’: Maghreb Magpie Pica mauritanica. This is because the Eurasian Magpie Pica pica complex has been redefined, creating and additional four species.

On the negative front, I’m afraid that if your only records of Southern Grey Shrike Lanius meridionalis are from the Canary Islands, or Egypt, or the Middle East, or India, you’ll have to strike this species off your list, as it has now been decided that these birds are all subspecies of Great Grey Shrike. The only place where Lanius meridionalis is resident is southern France and the Iberian Peninsula (Spain, Portugal, Gibraltar), with some birds wintering in north-west Africa. Consequently, the species has been renamed Iberian Grey Shrike.

There have been some more esoteric implications of the revisions in 8.2. For example, the warblers in south-west Cambodia and extreme south-east Thailand that were previously thought to be subspecies of Kloss’s Leaf Warbler have been reclassified as a subspecies of Davison’s Leaf Warbler. This reassignment is part of a wholesale redefinition and resequencing of the family Phylloscopidae – Leaf Warblers and Allies, which merges all the members of the former Seicercus genus into the single Phylloscopidae genus Phylloscopus.

The changes made to the IOC bird list during 2018 have had a major impact on one of the All the World’s Birds (ATWB) titles in particular: Focus on INDIAN SUBCONTINENT VOLUME 2: PASSERINES. To see these updates click here. For details of how the 8.1 and 8.2 IOC bird list changes have affected bird species that are regularly present in the Western Palearctic region, click here.

2019 editions of all currently available ATWB eBooks will be published in August 2018. Another blog post will make the announcement when they are ready to download.

 

So, as promised earlier, here is a summary of the 8.2 changes.

 

New to science

Megascops Screech Owls  +1 species  Santa Marta Screech Owl

Machaeropterus Manakins  + 1 species  Painted Manakin

Myzomela Honeyeaters  +1 species  Rote Myzomela

 

Splits

Thamnistes Antshrikes  +1 species

Psophodes Whipbirds  +1 species

Edolisoma Cicadabirds  +1 species

Rhipidura Fantails  +1

Pica Magpies  +4

Lophorina Birds-of-paradise  +2

Cyornis Jungle Flycatchers  +1

Sporophila Seedeaters  +1

 

Lumps

Megascops Screech Owls  -2  [Napo Screech Owl, Colombian Screech Owl]

Cranioleuca Ovenbirds  -1  [Baron’s Spinetail]

 

Re-defintion and re-sequencing of families

All species that were formerly members of families Tephrodornithidae – Woodshrikes and Allies and Prionopidae – Helmetshrikes have been transferred to the extended family Vangidae – Vangas and Allies.

The Cuckooshrikes family Campephagidae has been re-defined with the addition of new genera, and has been re-sequenced.

Family Phylloscopidae – Leaf Warblers and Allies has been redefined and resequenced.

Family Locustellidae – Grassbirds and Allies has been redefined and requenced.

 

In the IOC bird list there are now 10711 extant species (net +12) assigned to 244 families (-2). All 8.1 and 8.2 updates will be reflected in the 2019 editions of the ATWB Companion Guides.

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To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

ALL THE WORLD’S BIRDS 2018 TITLES COMPLETE

I am pleased to announce that all 10 titles in the 2018 editions of the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides are now complete and available to be downloaded to Kindle reading devices.

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWB. Or, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon US; or here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

In addition to the five titles announced in December 2017 – ALL THE WORLD’S NON-PASSERINES – the following eBooks are now available:

WORLD REGION guides:
All the World’s Birds 2018: A Companion Guide  OCEANS
All the World’s Birds 2018: A Companion Guide  WESTERN PALEARCTIC
All the World’s Birds 2018: A Companion Guide  SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

FOCUS ON guides:
All the World’s Birds 2018: A Companion Guide  Focus on INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES
All the World’s Birds 2018: A Companion Guide  Focus on INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
VOLUME 2: PASSERINES

Each guide deals with the birds to be found in a particular WORLD REGION or sub-region, and has a number of important features, including:
– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species
– An indication of where in the region each bird family and species can be found in its native state
– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2018’ series of Companion Guides is Version 7.3, published July 31 2017.

To find links to these Kindle eBooks on Amazon, and to see an up to date listing of all titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, click here.

KEEP IN TOUCH
Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

IOC BIRD LIST V8.1 RELEASED

On January 25 2018 the International Ornithological Congress (IOC) released the latest version of its world bird list (V8.1):

Gill, F & D Donsker (Eds). 2018. IOC World Bird List (v 8.1). doi :  10.14344/IOC.ML.8.1.

 

The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. Until 2017 the IOC bird list was updated fairly regularly at three-monthly intervals. From 2018 onwards it will be updated twice a year.

 

The details of the changes in the v8.1 release can be found by clicking on the Updates tab on the IOC website. Here is a summary of the major amendments:

 

New to science

Myrmoderus Antbirds  +1 species  Cordillera Azul Antbird

 

Splits

Goura Crowned Pigeons   +1 species

Malurus Fairywrens  +1 species

Catharus Nightingale-Thrushes  +1 species

Cinnyris Sunbirds  +1

Anthus Pipits  +2

 

Lumps

Caprimulgus Nightjars  -1  [Ruwenzori Nightjar]

Phyllastrephus Greenbuls  -1  [Liberian Greenbul]

 

Re-defintion and re-sequencing of families

The Antbirds family Thamnophilidae has been re-defined with the addition of new genera, and has been re-sequenced.

All the bird families in Part 12 of the IOC bird list v7.3 [New World Warblers to Cardinals, Grosbeaks and allies] have been re-defined and re-sequenced:

  • The single species genus Coereba Bananaquit, which was formerly assigned to its own family Coerebidae, has been assigned to family Thraupidae – Tanagers and allies
  • The v7.3 family Emberizidae – Buntings, New World Sparrows and allies has been split into two families: Emberizidae – Buntings and Passerellidae – New World Sparrows
  • A further nine new families have been defined, raising the number of families in Part 12 of the IOC bird list from 7 to 16
  • The six species that were formerly in the temporary ‘holding’ position in the v7.3 bird list Incertae Sedis 2 – Family Uncertain have been assigned to families, and a number of additional species in existing families have been transferred to other families
  • Part 12 of the IOC bird list v8.1 now runs from Calcariidae – Longspurs, Snow Buntings to Thraupidae – Tanagers and allies

 

In the IOC bird list there are now 10699 extant species (net +5) assigned to 246 families (net +9).

 

All these changes will be reflected in the 2019 editions of the ATWB Companion Guides. These editions will be released towards the end of 2018, after publication of the next version (v8.2) of the IOC bird list.

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To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

Each Companion Guide has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where in the world each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Region lists, with indications of restricted ranges within regions

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted worldwide range

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

ALL THE WORLD’S NON-PASSERINES

Today – December 20 2017 – sees the formal launch of the first five parts of the All the World’s Birds series (ATWB).

Between them these five Kindle eBooks cover all 4298 Non-Passerine bird species recognized by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. Until 2017 the IOC bird list was updated fairly regularly at three-monthly intervals. From 2018 onwards it will be updated twice a year. The version of the IOC bird list that is used in the 2018 versions of the ATWB guides is Version 7.3, published July 31 2017.

Gill, F & D Donsker (Eds). 2017. IOC World Bird List (v 7.3). doi :  10.14344/IOC.ML.7.3.

As a special offer, for the five days leading up to Christmas 2017, Parts 1 and 2 eBooks are available **ABSOLUTELY FREE**.

All the World's Birds 2018 PART-BY-PART: Ostriches to Anhingas, Darters          

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

Each Companion Guide has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where in the world each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Region lists, with indications of restricted ranges within regions

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted worldwide range

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

Within each Companion Guide Parts 1 to 5 you will find the following sections:

QUICK REFERENCE – follow the links to find birds based on their common English names

REGION LISTS – check which species occur regularly within each world region

COMPLETE LIST – taxonomic details, showing each species’ order, family, genus and scientific name

SPOTLIGHTED BIRDS – country and local endemics, plus selected regional endemics

Stay subscribed to this blog to receive more information about new ATWB titles as they are published.

Happy armchair birding!

IOC ANNOUNCES SEMIANNUAL REVISION SCHEDULE

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats.

Until 2017 the IOC bird list was updated fairly regularly at three-monthly intervals. On October 21 2017 the IOC announced that from 2018 onwards the list will be updated semiannually, and that there will be no Version 7.4.

Hence, the version of the IOC bird list that will be used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2018’ series of Companion Guides is Version 7.3, published July 31 2017.

As a result of this change, the first volumes in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2018’ series of Companion Guides have been able to be published earlier than originally planned. The first two volumes to be released are:

 

All the World’s Birds 2018: A Companion Guide
PART ONE: Ostriches to Anhingas, Darters

All the World’s Birds 2018: A Companion Guide
OCEANS

 

To find links to these Kindle eBooks on Amazon, and to see an up to date listing of all titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, click here.

 

KEEP IN TOUCH

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The Last Post

The primary purpose of this short blog post is to inform my current subscribers that the subject matter of the blog is about to change, and so you may wish to unsubscribe. Full details are below …

 

It seems scarcely possible that more than three years have passed since my most recent article on the topic of ‘How the media manipulate the news’. Yet here we are in 2017 watching the President of the United States telling the world’s press more or less exactly what I wrote about in 2014!

So what has happened during those three years …? We have seen a massive rise in the number of people in western democracies who no longer trust traditional news outlets, preferring instead to believe what they read and hear about via social media. We have witnessed, as a consequence, electoral results that have confounded conventional wisdom. And the phrase ‘fake news’ (a handy way of dismissing or ignoring items of truth that one doesn’t wish to acknowledge) has entered the vocabulary, along with the curiously oxymoronic ‘alternative facts’.

For me, what is taking place now resonates with what happened in the Roman Empire, when Cicero refined the art of rhetoric to amass popular support. The only thing that has really changed is the medium – twitter instead of chatter – but the message is broadly the same: you can’t trust the old order, so let’s clean out the Augean stables (translated: ‘drain the Washington swamp’).

Whatever you think of the Trump presidency (and Brexit, and Macron), the western media are largely responsible for promoting the rise of populism by undermining their own credibility. When even professed stalwarts of factual news like the BBC (‘full, fair and independent’) sends a helicopter to film the police raid on Cliff Richard’s house, and then refuses to admit it might have made a mistake, you know that a wind of change is blowing.

So where do we go from here? I’m not sure. When it is possible to find umpteen sources of material online to support and reinforce your own, preciously held world view (whether that be creationism, racism, sexism or one of many other ‘isms’), and you are being encouraged by the most powerful man in the world not to believe what you read about, see and hear from other sources, the situation can only deteriorate. There is no longer any need for my blog, as originally conceived: the comment and opinion writers in the media are (belatedly) doing that job now!

So thank you to my current subscribers for staying with me, but it is time to turn my attention to something different ….

[From November 2017 this blog will be used to promote a series of eBooks that have been designed for birdwatchers. It will advise subscribers of upcoming new eBooks in the series and updates to existing titles. Hence, if you don’t wish to receive notifications of these blog posts, please unsubscribe now: and thank you again for reading!]

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