Category Archives: Uncategorized

10 NEW INTERACTIVE CHECKLISTS

This month (November 2019) ten new Interactive Checklists have been published in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides, bringing the total number of ATWB titles that are complete and available for download to 42. (This number has doubled since October 2018.)

 

One of the major challenges facing birders when visiting an unfamiliar part of the world is working out which species they have a chance of connecting with during their visit. Traditional regional field guides, of course, are indispensable, but they have a number of shortcomings:

  • they are published and updated infrequently, meaning they cannot provide the latest information about species, regional distribution etc
  • they are generally inclusive, meaning they describe every bird species that has been recorded in the region, leaving the reader to sift through the vagrants, casuals and irruptive species that visiting birders are a lot less likely to encounter

To save birdwatchers the trouble of trawling through online information to supplement the details in their regional field guides, the All the World’s Birds (ATWB) Companion Guides series of Interactive Checklists is here to help. Over time, this series of eBooks will provide a library of up to date listings for areas of the world that are popular with birders. Already there are 17 Interactive Checklists to choose from covering areas of Indian Subcontinent and Wallacea, and now South-east Asia and North-west South America.

All of the ATWB 2020 series of Interactive Checklists embrace the latest taxonomy, including the recent major re-sequencing of Non-Passerine families.

 

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ Interactive Checklist series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBICOr, click here to see all ATWBIC titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWBIC titles on Amazon UK.

 

The ten new eBooks in the ATWB INTERACTIVE CHECKLIST series are:

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
NON-PENINSULAR MYANMAR

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
ANDAMAN AND NICOBAR ISLANDS

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

Click here to see the above three titles on Amazon US; or here to see them on Amazon UK. [You may need to click again if Amazon interprets your search incorrectly.]

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
WESTERN LOWLAND ECUADOR

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
ANDEAN ECUADOR

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
AMAZONIAN ECUADOR

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
WESTERN LOWLAND PERU

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
ANDEAN PERU

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
AMAZONIAN PERU

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist
GALÁPAGOS ISLANDS

Click here to see the above seven titles on Amazon US; or here to see them on Amazon UK. [You may need to click again if Amazon interprets your search incorrectly.]

 

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Some details …

 

Each ATWB Companion Guide deals with the birds to be found in a particular PART of the IOC bird list; a WORLD REGION or sub-region; or an area of the world popular with birders (e.g. North-east India).  All have a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where in each region each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2020’ series of Companion Guides is Version 9.2, published June 22 2019.

 

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

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KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

NAME THAT BIRD! (Part 2)

The International Ornithological Congress (IOC) established its world bird list to resolve a widespread problem amongst ornithologists worldwide: there were many examples of different bird species having the same English name. Now in its ninth year, the birdlist, which is hosted on the IOC’s World Bird Names website, is currently at Version 9.2.

Since its inception, the birdlist has gradually expanded its role to become a database of consensus about bird species taxonomy. However, I thought it would be appropriate to write a series of blog posts about the English names in the database, to recognise the IOC’s contribution to this particular aspect of ornithology.

The posts will be light-hearted and casual, appearing from time-to-time amid my more regular news items. This is the second such post (the first was published on 31st May this year).

 

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In v9.2 of the IOC bird list there are 10758 extant bird species.

150 species have an English name that consists of just one word. The shortest names are just 3 letters in length:

005/0076  Emu  Dromaius novaehollandiae of Australia

454/3691  Kea  Nestor notabilis, a New Zealand Parrot of southern New Zealand

and two Honeyeaters:

548/5327  Tui  Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae of New Zealand mainland, Kermadec, Chatham, Auckland islands

548/543Y  Mao   Gymnomyza aubryana of the Samoan islands

 

There are eight species with a single word name of 4 letters:

042/0119    Nene    Branta sandvicensis    (Hawaii)

042/0224    Smew    Mergellus albellus    (Western Palearctic, Asia)

201/127F    Sora    Porzana carolina    (Americas)

274/1571    Ruff    Calidris pugnax    (worldwide)

185/1180    Kagu    Rhynochetos jubatus    (New Caledonia)

684/6262    Rook    Corvus frugilegus    (Western Palearctic, Asia)

900/8012    Omao    Myadestes obscurus    (Hawaii)

900/903F    Iiwi    Drepanis coccinea    (Hawaii)

 

The bird species with the longest single-word English name is:

339/2466    Chuck-will’s-widow   Antrostomus carolinensis, a Nightjar of the Americas.

 

8822 species have an English name consisting of two words, and there are 1729 species with three words in their English name.

This leaves just 57 species having a four-word English name (none has more than four words).

 

The bird species with the longest English name (35 characters, including spaces) is:

925/8520    Prigogine’s Double-collared Sunbird   Cinnyris prigoginei,

a local endemic found only in south-east Democratic Republic of the Congo. Note that this name has three words (one of which is hyphenated).

 

The longest two-word English name comes in at 33 characters (including the blank space):

616/5571    Black-and-white Shrike-flycatcher    Bias musicus,

which is a member of the Vangas & Allies family resident in western, central and eastern Africa.

 

There are 7 species with three-word English names of 33 characters (none has 34 characters).

27 species have English names of 32 characters.

32 species have English names of 31 characters. The longest four-word names appear in this list:

379/3078    North Solomons Dwarf Kingfisher   Ceyx meeki

700/631F    King of Saxony Bird-of-paradise   Pteridophora alberti

804/6979    Northern Marquesan Reed Warbler   Acrocephalus percernis

804/697Y    Southern Marquesan Reed Warbler   Acrocephalus mendanae

 

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Some details …

 

Each of the ATWB 2020 Companion Guides has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2020’ series of Companion Guides is Version 9.2, published June 22 2019.

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KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

ALL THE WORLD’S BIRDS 2020 TITLES

I am pleased to announce that all 30 titles in the 2019 editions of the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides have been updated to 2020 editions and are available to be downloaded to Kindle reading devices.

In addition, two new titles have been introduced – PART ELEVEN of the PART-BY-PART Series and the third volume of the Focus On … NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA titles.

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2020’ series of Companion Guides is Version 9.2, published June 22 2019. This includes a major revision to the sequencing of Non-Passerine Orders, which is reflected in the contents of the ATWB 2020 titles.

To view the new sequence of Non-Passerine families click here: http://bit.ly/NonPns.

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

[Note: There is currently a technical problem with the search engine on Amazon.co.uk. One title – see below – does not appear in search results on this UK platform.]

The following eBooks are now available:

PART-BY-PART companion guides (search Books for ATWBPP):

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – PART ONE
OSTRICHES to HUMMINGBIRDS

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – PART TWO
TURACOS to FLAMINGOS

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – PART THREE
BUTTONQUAIL to HOATZIN

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – PART FOUR
NEW WORLD VULTURES to BEE-EATERS

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – PART FIVE
JACAMARS to OLD WORLD PARROTS

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – PART SIX
NEW ZEALAND WRENS to TYRANT FLYCATCHERS, CALYPTURA

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – PART SEVEN
COTINGAS to WHISTLERS & ALLIES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – PART ELEVEN
DIPPERS to FINCHES, EUPHONIAS   NEW!

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – PART TWELVE
LONGSPURS, SNOW BUNTINGS to TANAGERS & ALLIES

 

WORLD REGION guides (search Books for ATWBWR):

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – OCEANS

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – WESTERN PALEARCTIC

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

[Technical problem: to find the above title on Amazon.co.uk click on this link: http://bit.ly/ATWB20wr3uk]

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA
VOLUME 2: SUBOSCINE PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA
VOLUME 3: OSCINE PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – AUSTRALASIA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide – AUSTRALASIA
VOLUME 2: PASSERINES

 

FOCUS ON guides (search Books for ATWBFO):

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide  Focus on INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide  Focus on INDIAN SUBCONTINENT
VOLUME 2: PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide  Focus on SOUTH-EAST ASIA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide  Focus on SOUTH-EAST ASIA
VOLUME 2: PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide  Focus on NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide  Focus on NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA
VOLUME 2: SUBOSCINE PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide  Focus on NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA
VOLUME 3: OSCINE PASSERINES   NEW!

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide  Focus on WALLACEA
VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES

All the World’s Birds 2020: A Companion Guide  Focus on WALLACEA
VOLUME 2: PASSERINES

 

INTERACTIVE CHECKLISTS (search Books for ATWBIC):

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist   SRI LANKA

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist   SOUTH-WEST INDIA

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist   NORTH CENTRAL INDIA

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist   NORTH-EAST INDIA

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist   SULAWESI

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist   MOLUCCAS

All the World’s Birds 2020: Interactive Checklist   NUSA TENGGARA

 

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Some details …

 

Each of the ATWB Companion Guides has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

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THINK YOU KNOW YOUR BIRDS?

Try the ATWB BIRDQUIZ at http://bit.ly/ATWBbq.

 

KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

MAJOR SHAKE-UP OF NON-PASSERINES

On June 22 2019 the International Ornithological Congress (IOC) released the latest version of its world bird list (v 9.2):

Gill, F & D Donsker (Eds). 2019. IOC World Bird List (v 9.2). doi :  10.14344/IOC.ML.9.2.

The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The list is updated twice a year, in January and June.

The Non-Passerine Orders of bird families have been resequenced in release v 9.2 of the IOC birdlist. Here is an overview:

At the top of the list, the Paleognathae taxon of orders (Ostriches to Tinamous) remains unchanged.

At the foot of the Non-Passerines list, PICIFORMES to PSITTACIFORMES (Jacamars to Old World Parrots) remains unchanged, except for the inclusion of CARIAMIFORMES (Seriemas).

Between these two markers there has been a major upheaval, with APODIFORMES (for example), which includes Swifts and Hummingbirds, now considered to be evolved from a much older lineage, while ACCIPTRIFORMES (Vultures, Eagles, Buzzards etc.) and STRIGIFORMES (Owls) have been moved down the list as being more recently evolved Non-Passerine bird families.

One way to see the effect of these changes is to download one of the v 9.2 spreadsheets from the IOC website and set up a filter on the Rank column. Then remove the subspecies, species and genus rows from this filter to leave just taxons, orders and families.

OR … you can view a summary of the new sequence of Non-Passerine orders on the ATWB website by clicking here.

 

The details of other changes in the v 9.2 release can be found by clicking on the Updates tab on the IOC website. Here is a summary of the major amendments:

 

New to science

Oreotrochilus Hummingbirds  +1 species  Blue-throated Hillstar

Pycnonotus Bulbuls  +1 species  Cream-eyed Bulbul

 

Splits

Melanitta Ducks (Scoters)  +1 species

Cypsiurus Swifts  +1 species

Oreotrochilus Hummingbirds (Hillstars) +1 species

Gelochelidon Terns  +1 species

Coracias Rollers  +1 species

Xiphorhynchus Ovenbirds (Woodcreepers)  +1

Elaenia Tyrant Flycatchers (Elaenias)  +1

Pachycephala Whistlers +1 and Colluricincla Shrikethrushes  +6

Zosterops White-eyes  +2

Polioptila Gnatcatchers  +1

Turdus Thrushes  +2

Cyornis Blue Flycatchers  +2

Anthus Pipits  +1

 

Deletions

Schoutedenapus Swift  -1  [Schouteden’s Swift]

 

Lumps

Falco Falcons  -1  [Barbary Falcon]

Epinecrophylla Antwrens  -2  [Napo Stipple-throated Antwren, Yasuni Antwren]

 

Revision and resequencing of families

The Eurylaimidae family (Broadbills) has been revised, resequenced and split into three:

Family: Eurylaimidae – Typical Broadbills

Family: Philepittidae – Asities [e Madagascar]

Family: Calyptomenidae – African and Green Broadbills

The Australasian Robins family Petroicidae has been revised and resequenced.

Crested Shriketit, formerly ascribed to family Pachycephalidae (Whistlers & Allies) has been moved to a new monospecific family Falcunculidae.

The Incertae Sedis grouping of three unplaced African species has been resolved. One species [Grauer’s Warbler] has been ascribed to family Acrocephalidae (Reed Warblers & Allies), with the remaining two species forming a new family Hyliidae (Hylias).

 

In the IOC bird list there are now 10758 extant species (net +20) ascribed to 249 families.

 

All these changes will be reflected in the 2020 editions of the ATWB Companion Guides. These editions will start to be released during August 2019.

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

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Some details …

 

Each of the ATWB Companion Guides has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

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KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

NAME THAT BIRD! (Part 1)

The International Ornithological Congress (IOC) established its world bird list to resolve a widespread problem amongst ornithologists worldwide: there were many examples of different bird species having the same English name. Now in its ninth year, the birdlist, which is hosted on the IOC’s World Bird Names website, is currently at Version 9.1.

Since its inception, the birdlist has gradually expanded its role to become a database of consensus about bird species taxonomy. However, I thought it would be appropriate to write a series of blog posts about the English names in the database, to recognise the IOC’s contribution to this particular aspect of ornithology.

The posts will be light-hearted and casual, appearing from time-to-time amid my more regular news items. I hope you enjoy reading this first one as much as I enjoyed researching and putting it together.

So let’s begin with Primary Epithets. These are words that appear first in the English names of bird species, usually to distinguish them from other, similar species. Many are hyphenated, such as:

Black-throated, Curl-crested, Long-billed, Ochre-breasted

believe it or not, there are six species in v9.1 of the IOC birdlist with the primary epithet Ochre-breasted!

There are 3,315 different Primary Epithets in v9.1 pf the birdlist. 1,933 of them are used only once.

The most common primary epithet is Black, used as the first word in the English name of 90 species. Including all the occasions where Black- is used as a qualifier (such as in Black-backed, Black-and-white, Black-winged) this number increases to 538 species. There are also nine species that are Blackish, one that is Blackish-blue, one Blackish-grey and one Blackish-headed.

The longest primary epithet in v9.1 of the birdlist has 23 characters. The species which has this distinction is the Black-and-white-casqued Hornbill (Bycanistes subcylindricus).

Looking at relative geographical epithets: 70 species are described as Northern but just 55 as Southern, while there are 63 Western species but only 51 Eastern. Why this should be is a mystery!

A similar discrepancy occurs elsewhere. For example, there are 120 bird species which are named as being Great, Greater or Large, but only 68 that are described as being Lesser, 6 that are Small and 11 that are Least. Curiously there are no species considered to be ‘Greatest’ or ‘Largest’.

The names of continents and countries appear frequently. For example, there are 66 African, 28 American, 32 Indian and 20 Japanese species. Countries or islands that have endemic species also feature prominently: 14 birds have English names commencing Jamaican and 18 begin with Andaman. The names of countries that no longer exist also linger in the database – there are still 14 species described as being Abyssinian!

Birds named after people include 4 with the primary epithet Abbot’s, another 4 that are Elliot’s and 8 Finsch’s, while at the other end of the alphabet there are 6 species named as being Swainson’s, 6 Swinhoe’s and 7 Temminck’s. There are many instances of a person’s name appearing only once. Can you complete the English names of the species that start with: D’Arnaud’s, D’Orbigny’s, David’s, Davison’s and Deignan’s? Or how about Güldenstädt’s?

 

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Some details …

 

Each of the ATWB 2019 Companion Guides has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

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KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

ALL THE BIRDS OF MIDDLE AND SOUTH AMERICA

Some 14 months after the publication of the first volume (Non-Passerines), I am pleased to announce that the third and final volume of All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA has been published as a Kindle eBook.

This means birders now have one-click access to up to date information for all of the region’s 4018 bird species from their Kindle reading device – whether that be a Kindle, a tablet or a smart phone.

 

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AND … during the 2019 Easter Holiday (April 19 to 23) you can purchase ALL THREE of these volumes for less than $US 2 (before tax), or less than £UK 2 – click here for more details.

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The SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA World Region covers the landmass between the Mexico/USA border and Tierra del Fuego. It includes the Galápagos Islands and Falkland Islands (Malvinas), Aruba, Curaçao, Bonaire and Trinidad, as well as smaller islands within a short distance from the mainland coastline.

The bird species included are landbirds that are resident or otherwise regularly present within the region and in their native state. A separate section within each of the three volumes covers Introductions, plus species that have not been recorded for a while, or for which there is not enough information to be sure of their status within the region. Seabirds that breed within the SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA region are also included within Volume 1.

 

Use these three eBooks to explore and to improve your knowledge of SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA birds from the comfort of your home. Take your reading device with you when you go away on birding trips, and connect it to the internet for quick access to information about each species whenever you need it.

 

The three volumes now available from Amazon are as follows:

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA:
Volume 1: NON-PASSERINES

RHEAS to AFRICAN & NEW WORLD PARROTS  1607 species in 68 families

Amazon US     Amazon UK

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA:
Volume 2 SUBOSCINE PASSERINES

SAPAYOA to TITYRAS, BECARDS, SHARPBILL  1267 species in 12 families

Amazon US     Amazon UK

All the World’s Birds 2019: A Companion Guide – SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA:
Volume 3 OSCINE PASSERINES

SHRIKES to TANAGERS AND ALLIES  1144 species in 34 families

Amazon US     Amazon UK

 

[For a discussion about Suboscine vs. Oscine Passerines, see my blog post of October 13 2018:
5 NEW ALL THE WORLD’S BIRDS TITLES]

 

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ WORLD REGION series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBWROr, click here to see all ATWBWR titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWBWR titles on Amazon UK.

For more details about the WORLD REGION … series of ATWB Companion Guides, click here.

To find links to all available ATWB titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, click here.

 

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Some details …

 

Each of the ATWB 2019 Companion Guides has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

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KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

THE WORLD’S NEWEST BIRD FAMILIES

You probably know that our most ancient extant bird families are the Ratites, which include Ostriches, Rheas, Kiwis, Cassowaries and Emu. But which bird families are the most recently evolved?

In January 2018 the International Ornithological Congress (IOC) released version 8.1 of its world bird list, which is hosted on the IOC’s World Bird Names website. Version 8.1 included the results of a detailed study of all the bird families that are newer than Family: Fringillidae – Finches, Euphonias (Barker et al. 2013, 2015; NACC 2017-B-6). These most recently evolved families cover all the bird species that appear in Part Twelve of the IOC bird list in the All the World’s Birds series of Companion Guides.

Before v8.1 was released, there were 862 recognized extant bird species in Part 12 of the IOC bird list ascribed to 7 families, with a further 6 species temporarily lodged in a ‘Family Uncertain’ group with the Latin name Incertae Sedis 2. The order and species populations of these families were:

Family: Parulidae – New World Warblers    119

Family: Incertae Sedis 2 – Family Uncertain     6

Family: Icteridae – Oropendolas, Orioles and Blackbirds     108

Family: Coerebidae – Bananaquit    1

Family: Emberizidae – Buntings, New World Sparrows and allies    181

Family: Thraupidae – Tanagers and allies    394

Family: Calcariidae – Longspurs, Snow Buntings    6

Family: Cardinalidae – Cardinals, Grosbeaks and allies    53

 

The Barker et al. study, which applied the latest techniques for assessing relationships between bird species based on genetic analysis, discovered that the most recently evolved bird family was not the Cardinalidae but the Thraupidae. The study also revealed the existence of ten new families, while Bananaquit was ascribed to the Thraupidae family. The six species from Incertae Sedis 2 were ascribed to families, and many others were moved to a new or different family. v8.2 of the IOC bird list (published in June 2018) added one extra species when White-collared Seedeater was split into two species: Cinnamon-rumped Seedeater and Morelet’s Seedeater. Two families were also given modified English names.

 

So at the start of 2019 there were 869 extant bird species in Part 12 of the IOC bird list, grouped into 16 families ordered as follows:

Family: Calcariidae – Longspurs, Snow Buntings    6

Family: Rhodinocichlidae – Thrush-tanager    1

Family: Emberizidae – Buntings    44

Family: Passerellidae – New World Sparrows    135

Family: Calyptophilidae – Chat-tanagers    2

Family: Phaenicophilidae – Hispaniolan Tanagers    4

Family: Nesospingidae – Puerto Rican Tanager    1

Family: Spindalidae – Spindalises    4

Family: Zeledoniidae – Wrenthrush    1

Family: Teretistridae – Cuban Warblers    2

Family: Icteriidae – Yellow-breasted Chat    1

Family: Icteridae – Oropendolas, Orioles and Blackbirds     108

Family: Parulidae – New World Warblers    119

Family: Mitrospingidae – Mitrospingid Tanagers    4

Family: Cardinalidae – Cardinals, Grosbeaks and (Tanager) Allies    53

Family: Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies    384

 

The full details of these families and species, and how they are distributed throughout the world, are in a newly published ATWB title:

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – PART TWELVE

Amazon US     Amazon UK

 

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ PART-BY-PART series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBPPOr, click here to see all ATWBPP titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWBPP titles on Amazon UK.

For more details about the PART-BY-PART … series of ATWB Companion Guides, click here.

To find links to all available ATWB titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, click here.

 

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Some details …

 

Each of the ATWB 2019 Companion Guides has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

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IOC BIRD LIST V9.1 RELEASED

On January 20 2019 the International Ornithological Congress (IOC) released the latest version of its world bird list (V9.1):

Gill, F & D Donsker (Eds). 2019. IOC World Bird List (v 9.1). doi :  10.14344/IOC.ML.9.1.

 

The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The list is updated twice a year, in January and July.

 

The details of the changes in the v9.1 release can be found by clicking on the Updates tab on the IOC website. Here is a summary of the major amendments:

 

New to science

Campylopterus Hummingbirds  +1 species  Dry-forest Sabrewing

Dicrurus Drongos  +1 species  Western Square-tailed Drongo

 

Splits

Ninox Owls (Boobooks)  +4 species

Urochroa Hummingbirds (Hillstars)  +1 species

Automolus Ovenbirds (Foliage-gleaners)  +1 species

Myrmothera and Grallaricula Antpittas  +2

Sericornis Australasian Warblers (Scrubwrens)  +1

Laniarius Bushsrikes (Boubous)  +1

Vireo Vireos  +1

Dicrurus Drongos  +3

Calandrella Larks  +1

Phylloscopus Warblers  +1

Zosterops White-eyes  +11

Ramphocaenus Gnatcatchers (Gnatwrens)  +1

Brachypteryx Shortwings  +3

 

Lumps

Nothura Nothuras  -1  [Chaco Nothura]

Lanius Shrikes  -1  [Steppe Grey Shrike]

Calandrella Larks  -1  [Erlanger’s Lark]

Zosterops White-eyes  -2  [Mountain White-eye, Enganno White-eye]

Ramphocelus Tanagers  -1  [Cherrie’s Tanager]

 

Revision and resequencing of families

The Ovenbirds family Furnariidae has been revised and resequenced.

Part of the Australasian Warblers family Acanthizidae has been revised and resequenced.

The Laughingthrushes and Allies family Leiothrichidae has been revised and resequenced.

The Zosterops genus in Family: Zosteropidae – White-eyes has been revised and resequenced. As a result of this revision there are 9 net new species in the genus, bringing the total to 96.

 

In the IOC bird list there are now 10738 extant species (net +27) ascribed to 244 families.

 

All these changes will be reflected in the 2020 editions of the ATWB Companion Guides. These editions will be released towards the end of August 2019, after publication of the next version (v9.2) of the IOC bird list.

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Some details …

 

Each of the ATWB 2019 Companion Guides has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

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KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

THE BIRDS OF WALLACEA

The world region AUSTRALASIA (AUS) is bounded in the north-west by a notional line that separates the ASIA world region (to the west) from the AUS world region (to the east). The line is named after the 19th century naturalist Alfred Wallace, who was the first to observe that west of this line reside Asian animal species, while to the east there is a mixture of Asian and Australasian species. The line is shown in solid red on the left (west) side and top (north) of the map you can see by clicking here.

 

Starting in the lower left (south-west) corner of the map, the Wallace Line separates the south central Indonesia islands of Bali (Asia) from Lombok (Australasia); heads northwards to divide the Java Sea (Asia) from the Flores Sea (Australasia); and runs through the Makassar Strait between the island of Borneo (Asia) and the north central Indonesia island Sulawesi (Australasia). The northern boundary of the AUS world region then curves north-eastwards through the Celebes Sea, passing south of the southernmost tip of Mindanao in the country of the Philippines (which is in the ASIA world region), and running north of the Talaud Islands (in AUS), which are in the north-east corner of north central Indonesia.

 

WALLACEA is the name given to the group of islands that form a biogeographical subregion in north-west AUS to the east of the Wallace Line. On the map it is the area within the solid red line. The subregion is separated from the Asian and Australasian continental shelves by deep-water straits, and is home to a diverse collection of birds in 80 families. Apart from two sections of the island of Timor (mostly the eastern part), which make up the country of Timor-Leste (located in the south central part of the region), the whole of Wallacea lies within the country of Indonesia.

 

712 of the bird species recognized in The IOC World Bird List (see below) are regularly present in the Wallacea region, including 64 species of Pigeons, Doves (Family: Columbidae) and 28 species of Honeyeaters (Family: Meliphagidae). Of these, no fewer than 41 Columbidae species and 26 Meliphagidae species can be found regularly in their native state only in Indonesia or Timor-Leste, many on just a single island!

 

The details are in these two newly published ATWB titles:

All the World’s Birds 2019: Focus on WALLACEA Volume 1: NON-PASSERINES   

Amazon US     Amazon UK

All the World’s Birds 2019: Focus on WALLACEA Volume 2: PASSERINES

Amazon US     Amazon UK

 

I am also pleased to announce that an additional 3 titles in the 2019 series of ATWB Interactive Checklists are now complete and available to be downloaded to Kindle reading devices. These cover three important and popular birding destinations within the Wallacea region:

All the World’s Birds 2019: Interactive Checklist  SULAWESI (nc Indonesia)

Amazon US     Amazon UK

All the World’s Birds 2019: Interactive Checklist  MOLUCCAS (ne Indonesia)

Amazon US     Amazon UK

All the World’s Birds 2019: Interactive Checklist  NUSA TENGGARA (sc Indonesia)

Amazon US     Amazon UK

 

If you are planning a birding trip to Wallacea, or are thinking of visiting the region for its wealth of country and regional endemics, then the above five recently published ATWB titles are a must read before you go, and a handy resource to take with you on your Kindle, tablet or smartphone.

 

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ FOCUS ON … series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBFOOr, click here to see all ATWBFO titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWBIC titles on Amazon UK.

For more details about the FOCUS ON … series of ATWB Companion Guides, click here.

To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of INTERACTIVE CHECKLISTS, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBICOr, click here to see all ATWBIC titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWBIC titles on Amazon UK.

For more details about the INTERACTIVE CHECKLISTS series of ATWB Companion Guides, click here.

To find links to all available ATWB titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, click here.

 

***************************

Some details …

 

Each of the ATWB 2019 Companion Guides has a number of important features, including:

– A complete taxonomic listing of bird species

– An indication of where each bird family and species can be found in its native state

– Spotlighted species that have a restricted regional or worldwide range

 

However, perhaps the key feature of all eBooks in the Companion Guide series is the way you can quickly and simply access relevant, up to date online information about every featured bird species. If your reading device is connected to the internet, a single click will take you to a search results page for a species, from where you can continue to search for additional information to whatever level of detail you desire.

 

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

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KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

AMAZON CONVERSION PROGRAM PROBLEM

I was hoping I wouldn’t have to write this blog post.

Towards the end of October this year, the conversion program supplied by Amazon that is used in the publishing process for Kindle eBooks was updated. Following that change, the bird lists in the eBooks that I develop in Microsoft Word were not being presented correctly in tablet and phone Kindle reading apps. The conversion program introduced an indentation at the start of each paragraph in the lists. This didn’t happen on Kindle reading devices.

What this meant for the All the World’s Birds series of eBooks was that lists of bird species were no longer neatly left-aligned on tablets and phones. Also, because of the unwanted indentation, some lines were now too long and wrapped to the following line, even on the smallest font setting. The result on these reading devices was a mess.

Any ATWB title that was published prior to the end of October 2018 was unaffected. So customers are still able to purchase these titles with the confidence that they will be formatted acceptably on any reading device (Kindle/tablet/phone).

Unfortunately, before I spotted what was happening I updated the content of three existing titles and published one new one. The affected titles were:

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – PART-BY-PART
PART THREE: SANDGROUSE to OWLS
PART FOUR: FROGMOUTHS to HORNBILLS
PART FIVE: JACAMARS to OLD WORLD PARROTS

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – FOCUS ON
NORTH-WEST SOUTH AMERICA VOLUME 2: SUBOSCINE PASSERINES:
SAPAYOA to TITYRAS, BECARDS, SHARPBILL

I highlighted the problem to Amazon and they appear to be experimenting with a new conversion program that more faithfully reproduces the intended layout. I managed to pick up and use this new program for two of the above titles: PART THREE and PART FOUR, which are now neatly laid out for use on all reading devices. However, the new conversion program is still being worked on – it comes and goes! So I still haven’t been able to re-publish the remaining two affected titles. With luck this will all be sorted out soon and normal service can resume.

Meanwhile, I have annotated the Description text for the remaining two corrupted titles, warning customers not to purchase them unless they intend to use them only on Kindle readers, and otherwise recommending that they postpone their purchase until after the conversion program problem has been resolved.

I first raised this problem with Amazon at the start of November, but five weeks later I am still in the situation where:

  • I cannot publish any new titles (I have five eBooks ready that I wanted to publish in December)
  • I cannot update the content of any existing titles
  • I have two remaining published titles that do not display correctly on tablets and phones

In the lead up to Christmas this situation has severely affected the extent of online marketing I can do. It has also somewhat dampened my enthusiasm for developing new titles.

Nevertheless, I shall follow through on my promise to make four titles available free-of-charge for a limited period. The following four eBooks – one from each ATWB series – will be free to download from Amazon from Sunday December 16 to Thursday December 20 USA Pacific time:

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – PART-BY-PART
PART THREE: SANDGROUSE to OWLS

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – WORLD REGIONS
SOUTH AMERICA/MIDDLE AMERICA VOLUME 1: NON-PASSERINES:
RHEAS to AFRICAN & NEW WORLD PARROTS

All the World’s Birds 2019 : A Companion Guide – FOCUS ON
INDIAN SUBCONTINENT VOLUME 2: PASSERINES: BROADBILLS to BUNTINGS

All the World’s Birds 2019 : Interactive Checklists
SOUTH-WEST INDIA: DUCKS, GEESE AND SWANS to FINCHES, EUPHONIAS

Here are your links:

Amazon US
https://amzn.to/2C1NPPC    https://amzn.to/2KTOrpz
https://amzn.to/2ATaNaV    https://amzn.to/2CycmMo

Amazon UK
https://amzn.to/2PPDRUk    https://amzn.to/2P7eaOA
https://amzn.to/2OmTiBO    https://amzn.to/2MWhlep

Greetings of the season and a prosperous 2019 to all my readers!

 

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To see all the currently available titles in the ‘All the World’s Birds’ series, search in the Books section of your local Amazon site for ATWBOr, click here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon USor here to see all ATWB titles on Amazon UK.

The ‘All the World’s Birds’ series of Companion Guides derives its taxonomy, English names and scientific names from The IOC World Bird List, an open access resource maintained by the International Ornithological Congress (IOC). The IOC bird list is hosted on a dedicated World Bird Names website, which provides access to the list in various different formats. The version of the IOC bird list used in the ‘All the World’s Birds 2019’ series of Companion Guides is Version 8.2, published June 27 2018.

KEEP IN TOUCH

Sign up to this blog to be informed about releases of new titles in the All the World’s Birds Companion Guide series, and of developments in the IOC bird list.

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